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#ElderCareChat 11/7/12 Recap: Managing Holiday Stress

By Michelle Seitzer / Posted on 09 November 2012

Martha Stewart makes the holidays look easy, but 1) that’s her job, and 2) everything looks easier on TV.

Truthfully, there isn’t much that’s easy about the holidays, especially if you’re a caregiver and have older relatives with different health issues or special care needs. Or if you have to travel. Or if you disagree with other family members about what’s best for an aging parent. Not to mention the fact that the emphasis on gathering with family and friends during the holiday season is a painful reminder for many people of past or recent losses and major life changes.

No, the holidays are not easy, but that doesn’t mean they cannot or should not be enjoyed to the full. Planning ahead and preparing for the stress of being off schedule (and plenty of wine, chocolate, holiday cookies, music or whatever gives a quick boost) is the best way to “Grinch-proof” the season and fight the frantic, frazzled person one can easily become this time of year.

During this week’s discussion, most of our 44 participants shared the sentiment of letting go of the need for Martha Stewart perfection, and instead seeking out the beautiful bonding moments that often happen during the less glamourous parts of holiday gatherings — say, while washing dishes and cleaning up after Christmas dinner.

The following questions guided Wednesday’s real-time discussion on Twitter:

  1. What additional stress does the holiday season create for a family caregiver?
  2. What suggestions can you offer to help a family caregiver manage these stresses?
  3. What additional stress does the holiday create for an individual with physical disabilities?
  4. What suggestions can you offer to help an individual with disabilities manage the holidays?
  5. What additional stress does the holiday create for an individual with cognitive impairments?
  6. What suggestions can you offer to help an individual with cognitive impairments manage the holidays?
  7. How do you manage your holiday stress?
  8. Which holiday traditions do you enjoy the most?
  9. If you could suggest a new tradition a family caregiver could start this year, what would it be?

 

Here are a few highlights:

Also, check out our blog posts on various holiday topics — covering everything from dealing with depression to adjusting to visits in assisted living and more — here.

Check out the full chat transcript (thanks to @ctffox of The Fox Group for furnishing this service) here. Analytics are available too; click here for the “chat stats.”

Don’t miss our next chat: Wednesday, November 21st at 1pm ET. We meet only on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month. Anyone who is interested in and passionate about eldercare issues can join us — anytime. Prior participation is not required, nor is there a need to stay for the full hour.

If the “real-time” frame doesn’t sync with your schedule, or if you feel that your question or idea requires well beyond 140 characters, start a discussion thread on our LinkedIn page or use the #eldercarechat hashtag. The LinkedIn group is also a great place to continue previous discussions, connect with those who share similar interests, or talk about the services you — or the company you represent — have to offer.  

Also, check out our blog posts on various holiday topics — covering everything from dealing with depression to adjusting to visits in assisted living and more — here.

Check out the full chat transcript (thanks to @ctffox of The Fox Group for furnishing this service) here. Analytics are available too; click here for the “chat stats.”

Don’t miss our next chat: Wednesday, November 21st at 1pm ET. Please note that there are no more chats scheduled for this month, as we meet only on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month. Anyone who is interested in and passionate about eldercare issues can join us — anytime. Prior participation is not required, nor is there a need to stay for the full hour.

If the “real-time” frame doesn’t sync with your schedule, or if you feel that your question or idea requires well beyond 140 characters, start a discussion thread on our LinkedIn page or use the #eldercarechat hashtag. The LinkedIn group is also a great place to continue previous discussions, connect with those who share similar interests, or talk about the services you — or the company you represent — have to offer.

There are 2 Comments about this post

  1. Kaye Swain says,

    Thanks for another grand #ElderCareChat. It was so jam packed with great ideas, I literally couldn’t keep up! (Of course, the grandkids popping up from rest time with questions didn’t help either :) Ah well – some of the joys of the Sandwich Generation! :) ). I am already implementing a couple of ideas I got during the chat! Thanks again!

     

    on 10 November 2012 / 10:23 AM

     
  2. You’re so welcome, Kaye! It’s always a pleasure to moderate/engage with such a fantastic group of caring, creative and FUN people. It was definitely jam-packed — I agree! It was hard for me to keep up and I didn’t have the sweet interruptions you did. That’s true — the joys of the SG! Glad you’re already implementing ideas. I did too; took a self-care day and got a massage post-chat! :)

     

    on 11 November 2012 / 10:12 AM

     
 

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